Sunday, February 01, 2015

Honey Prototypes Show Antimicrobial Activity

The antimicrobial activity of prototype modified honeys that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide

BMC Res Notes. 2015 Jan 28;8(1):20

Background

Antimicrobial resistance continues to be a global issue in healthcare organisations. Honey has long been shown to possess wound healing and antimicrobial properties that are dependent on a number of physical and chemical properties of the honey. We tested the antimicrobial activity of a medicinal honey, Surgihoney® (SH) and two prototype modified honeys made by Apis mellifera (honeybee) against Staphylococcus aureus (NCIMB 9518). We also examined the modified honey prototypes for the ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) by changing the level of production of hydrogen peroxide from the samples.

Methods

Surgihoney® (SH) was compared with two modified honeys, Prototype 1 (PT1) and Prototype 2 (PT2) using a bioassay method against a standard strain of Staphylococcus aureus. Further work studied the rate of generation of ROS hydrogen peroxide from these preparations.

Results

Surgihoney® antimicrobial activity was shown to be largely due to ROS hydrogen peroxide production. By modification of Surgihoney®, two more potent honey prototypes were shown to generate between a two- and three-fold greater antibacterial activity and up to ten times greater ROS peroxide activity.

Conclusions

Surgihoney® is a clinically available wound antiseptic dressing that shows good antimicrobial activity. Two further honey prototypes have been shown to have antimicrobial activity that is possible to be enhanced due to demonstrated increases in ROS peroxide activity.

Saturday, January 31, 2015

Anti-Aging Serum Contains Bee Products

Sciote Advanced Bio Serum Review
Truth in Aging, 1/30/2015

I had the opportunity to test the Sciote Advanced Bio Serum ($70). This serum contains bee by-products, combined with antioxidants and "plant bio-actives," which help improve the texture and appearance of the skin by reducing redness and calming rosacea. It worked for me.

I initially used the Sciote Advanced Bio Serum on only one side of my face for about four weeks. I have had positive results, but I need to explain my skin type for you to understand why I think this worked for me. I am 50 years old and have dry, sensitive, sun-damaged skin that is prone to breakouts and redness. I used this serum along with other facial products, including a prescription for acne, a moisturizer with sunscreen (SPF 30) and a calming moisturizer as a last step in the line-up. The Sciote serum is a fragrance-free, colorless, light gel that I used morning and night. It plays well with other products and didn't seem to mind where in the order of my regimen it was placed, although I usually used it after my prescription and before the moisturizers and sunscreen.

It is important to note I have had success in the past using bee-related products, like Royal Nectar's face mask and moisturizer. For my skin, bee products seem to do a good job of addressing inflammation, reducing redness and tightening slightly (without dryness). Sure enough, this Sciote serum contains bee propolis and royal jelly, plus gotu kola, and had a similar effect.

I read that humans have been using propolis (used by bees to coat their hives) for thousands of years for many purposes, but primarily on wounds to fight infection; propolis does indeed have antiseptic properties. Royal jelly is produced by worker honey bees and typically contains about 60% to 70% water, 12% to 15% proteins, 10% to 16% sugar, 3% to 6% fats, and 2% to 3% vitamins, salts, and amino acids; it is used for various ailments including skin disorders…

Friday, January 30, 2015

Apitherapy Scientist a Finalist for New Zealand's Innovator of the Year Award

Acclaim spreads for honey's greatest fan
Bay of Plenty Times, 1/27/2015

A Tauranga-based scientist who developed honey-based products with anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties is a finalist for New Zealand's Innovator of the Year award.

Shaun Holt is co-founder and science director of HoneyLab, which is conducting the world's largest clinical research programme on the medical use of honey and bee products for dermatology, nutrition and pain management...

Thursday, January 29, 2015

Red Propolis May Help Treat High Blood Pressure

Brazilian red propolis attenuates hypertension and renal damage in 5/6 renal ablation model
PLoS One. 2015 Jan 21;10(1):e0116535
The pathogenic role of inflammation and oxidative stress in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is well known. Anti-inflammatories and antioxidant drugs has demonstrated significant renoprotection in experimental nephropathies. 
Moreover, the inclusion of natural antioxidants derived from food and herbal extracts (such as polyphenols, curcumin and lycopene) as an adjuvant therapy for slowing CKD progression has been largely tested. Brazilian propolis is a honeybee product, whose anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant effects have been widely shown in models of sepsis, cancer, skin irritation and liver fibrosis. Furthermore, previous studies demonstrated that this compound promotes vasodilation and reduces hypertension. However, potential renoprotective effects of propolis in CKD have never been investigated.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a subtype of Brazilian propolis, the Red Propolis (RP), in the 5/6 renal ablation model (Nx). Adult male Wistar rats underwent Nx and were divided into untreated (Nx) and RP-treated (Nx+RP) groups, after 30 days of surgery; when rats already exhibited marked hypertension and proteinuria. Animals were observed for 90 days from the surgery day, when Nx+RP group showed significant reduction of hypertension, proteinuria, serum creatinine retention, glomerulosclerosis, renal macrophage infiltration and oxidative stress, compared to age-matched untreated Nx rats, which worsened progressively over time.
In conclusion, RP treatment attenuated hypertension and structural renal damage in Nx model. Reduction of renal inflammation and oxidative stress could be a plausible mechanism to explain this renoprotection.

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Invitation to the XIII-th. German Apitherapy Congress with International Participation

Dear All,

I am happy to let you know that you can find now in www.apitherapie.de the preliminary program + the application forms + details on the venue of our international event.

We already have confirmations of participation from several countries including Canada, France, Indonesia, Lithuania, Belgium, Austria and of course from Romania and Germany.

If you send us your registration before February 15-th., you will benefit of our attractive early bird registration fees.

This year we will discuss on new topics related to Apitherapy, including on new beehive air therapy related devices.

Also, for the first time, we will organize international photo and bee products quality contests.

If interested to learn more, together with us, on this fascinating field named Apitherapy, please come to Germany end of March!

Also,please kindly forward this e-mail to all your best friends and colleagues.

Thank you very much!

Best regards from Romania,

Dr Stefan Stangaciu

President of the Romanian and German Apitherapy Societies.
Secretary General of the International Federation of Apitherapy

E-mail: drstangaciu@gmail.com + drstangaciu@apitherapy.com
www.Apitherapy.com + www.Apitherapie.de + www.apiterapie.ro
Skype ID: dr.stefan.stangaciu
http://www.facebook.com/drstangaciu

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Cardiac Effects of Mad Honey Poisoning

Cardiac Effects of Mad Honey Poisoning and Its Management in Emergency Department: A Review from Turkey
Cardiovasc Toxicol. 2015 Jan 23

Mad honey poisoning occurs when honey containing grayanotoxin is digested. The most common clinical signs and symptoms of poisoning involve findings of digestive system irritation, severe bradycardia and hypotension and central nervous system reaction.

In this review, we aimed to underline the cardiac effects of mad honey poisoning. We also aimed to raise the awareness of physicians about early diagnosis and treatment of this rare entity.

Monday, January 26, 2015

Manuka Honey Used to Treat Athlete’s Foot

What Are The Benefits of Manuka Honey?
The Huffington Post Canada, 1/23/2015

Nutritionists have been telling us to avoid processed foods and sugar, so it's no surprise that ingredients from different parts of the world are taking up space in our pantry to replace them.

Manuka honey, which comes from New Zealand, is one of those superfoods that claims to help a host of ailments all in one teaspoonful. It's collected from honeybees that forage at native manuka (or tea tree) trees in New Zealand, according to the NHS. Tea tree is well-known for its antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activity.

The active ingredient in the honey, methylglyoxal (MG) has been given a rating known as UMF (Unique Manuka Factor), which helps to differentiate the honey between the many fake products sold on the market. A rating of 10 or higher is considered therapeutic, explains DrWeil.com…

If you're suffering from a fungal infection like athlete's foot, nail fungus or ringworm, manuka honey could help clear it up. Put the honey on the affected area, instructs HealthRemediesWeb.com, and cover with cotton socks.

Sunday, January 25, 2015

New Manuka Honey Wound Dressings

David Navazio Announces New Gentell Wound Care Products Made With Honey

Gentell Honey Gauze “Manuka” Dressing and Gentell Honey Alginate Dressing, both made with medical grade honey, are designed to treat wet or dry wounds.

Bristol, PA (PRWEB) January 24, 2015

David Navazio, Executive Vice President and Founder of Gentell, Inc. (http://www.gentell.com), a leading manufacturer of wound and skin care products, recently announced the availability of two new wound care products designed to be highly effective in treating both wet and dry wounds.

Gentell Honey Gauze Dressing, impregnated with 100% Leptospermum (Manuka) Medical Grade Honey, helps promote moist healing in challenging wounds and burns exhibiting low volumes of exudate (fluid). Gentell Honey Alginate Dressing, also infused with 100% Leptospermum Medical Grade Honey, supports moist healing in challenging wounds and burns exhibiting higher volumes of exudate. Gentell offers the Honey Gauze Dressing in 4” x 4”, and the Honey Alginate Dressings in 2”x 2” and 4.5” x 4.5” sizes.

“The use of medical grade honey for the treatment of aggressive or chronic wounds is currently resurging in popularity,” David Navazio observed. “A growing number of customers have inquired specifically about wound products designed with medical grade honey. We introduced Gentell gauze and calcium alginate dressings to meet the growing demand.”…

Saturday, January 24, 2015

Honey is a Natural Cure

5 First Aid Options That Are In Your Kitchen Right Now

Health AIM, 1/23/2015

Providing an appropriate first aid is crucial in dealing with a sudden onset of injury or illness. It is always advisable to keep a professional first aid kit to combat major emergencies. But what would you do while dealing with minor ailments that really do not require a visit to the doctor? Here is a list of things that can come in handy while dealing with minor health issues. Interesting thing is that you may already have them in your kitchen.

Honey: Honey is a natural cure, if you are suffering with a terrible hangover. The antioxidants present in honey detoxify the body and provide a soothing effect. The potassium content helps with salt imbalance as well. Manuka honey, extracted from manuka tree common in Australia and New Zealand, can be extremely helpful when it comes to minor wounds and skin infections. The antibacterial properties are a result of a compound called Unique Manuka Factor (UMF)…

Friday, January 23, 2015

Brazilian Red Propolis Prevents Kidney Damage

Brazilian Red Propolis Attenuates Hypertension and Renal Damage in 5/6 Renal Ablation Model
PLoS One. 2015 Jan 21;10(1):e0116535

The pathogenic role of inflammation and oxidative stress in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is well known. Anti-inflammatories and antioxidant drugs has demonstrated significant renoprotection in experimental nephropathies. Moreover, the inclusion of natural antioxidants derived from food and herbal extracts (such as polyphenols, curcumin and lycopene) as an adjuvant therapy for slowing CKD progression has been largely tested. Brazilian propolis is a honeybee product, whose anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant effects have been widely shown in models of sepsis, cancer, skin irritation and liver fibrosis. Furthermore, previous studies demonstrated that this compound promotes vasodilation and reduces hypertension. However, potential renoprotective effects of propolis in CKD have never been investigated.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a subtype of Brazilian propolis, the Red Propolis (RP), in the 5/6 renal ablation model (Nx). Adult male Wistar rats underwent Nx and were divided into untreated (Nx) and RP-treated (Nx+RP) groups, after 30 days of surgery; when rats already exhibited marked hypertension and proteinuria. Animals were observed for 90 days from the surgery day, when Nx+RP group showed significant reduction of hypertension, proteinuria, serum creatinine retention, glomerulosclerosis, renal macrophage infiltration and oxidative stress, compared to age-matched untreated Nx rats, which worsened progressively over time.

In conclusion, RP treatment attenuated hypertension and structural renal damage in Nx model. Reduction of renal inflammation and oxidative stress could be a plausible mechanism to explain this renoprotection.

Thursday, January 22, 2015

Allergy After Ingestion of Bee-Gathered Pollen: Influence of Botanical Origins

Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol, Published Online: January 16, 2015
Bee-gathered pollen is increasingly consumed around the world because of its purported nutritive and therapeutic values. Although rare, ingested pollens can induce severe adverse reactions, particularly in allergic individuals. These risks are exacerbated by the fact that products sold as “bee pollen” are made up of variable content, making them difficult to characterize and standardize. Until recently, several case reports reviewed by Jagdis and Sussman have described anaphylactic reactions after ingesting bee pollen supplements.

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

New Zealand Manuka Trial Scheme Pleasing

Sun Live, 1/21/2015

A trial scheme along a small plantation for manuka honey and oil on the Rangitaiki riverbank is providing pleasing results.

Bay of Plenty Regional Council is working with the Rangitaiki River Forum, Maori Lands Trusts, local landowners, Trust Power and Manuka Bioactives Limited to trial the scheme.

The international market for manuka products is strong and may provide an opportunity for landholders to plant a native species in marginal land areas to generate a small income...

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Bee Venom May Help Treat Acne

Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Jan 19;1:CD009436

BACKGROUND:

Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed.

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris.

SEARCH METHODS:

We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014,Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author.

MAIN RESULTS:

We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four trials in two meta-analyses, with two trials in each meta-analysis. The categories of CAM included herbal medicine, acupuncture, cupping therapy, diet, purified bee venom (PBV), and tea tree oil. A pharmaceutical company funded one trial; the other trials did not report their funding sources.Our main primary outcome was 'Improvement of clinical signs assessed through skin lesion counts', which we have reported as 'Change in inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesion counts', 'Change of total skin lesion counts', 'Skin lesion scores', and 'Change of acne severity score'. For 'Change in inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesion counts', we combined 2 studies that compared a low- with a high-glycaemic-load diet (LGLD, HGLD) at 12 weeks and found no clear evidence of a difference between the groups in change in non-inflammatory lesion counts (mean difference (MD) -3.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) -10.07 to 2.29, P = 0.10, 75 participants, 2 trials, low quality of evidence). However, although data from 1 of these 2 trials showed benefit of LGLD for reducing inflammatory lesions (MD -7.60, 95% CI -13.52 to -1.68, 43 participants, 1 trial) and total skin lesion counts (MD -8.10, 95% CI -14.89 to -1.31, 43 participants, 1 trial) for people with acne vulgaris, data regarding inflammatory and total lesion counts from the other study were incomplete and unusable in synthesis.Data from a single trial showed potential benefit of tea tree oil compared with placebo in improving total skin lesion counts (MD -7.53, 95% CI -10.40 to -4.66, 60 participants, 1 trial, low quality of evidence) and acne severity scores (MD -5.75, 95% CI -9.51 to -1.99, 60 participants, 1 trial). Another trial showed pollen bee venom to be better than control in reducing numbers of skin lesions (MD -1.17, 95% CI -2.06 to -0.28, 12 participants, 1 trial).Results from the other 31 trials showed inconsistent effects in terms of whether acupuncture, herbal medicine, or wet-cupping therapy were superior to controls in increasing remission or reducing skin lesions.Twenty-six of the 35 included studies reported adverse effects; they did not report any severe adverse events, but specific included trials reported mild adverse effects from herbal medicines, wet-cupping therapy, and tea tree oil gel.Thirty trials measured two of our secondary outcomes, which we combined and expressed as 'Number of participants with remission'. We were able to combine 2 studies (low quality of evidence), which compared Ziyin Qinggan Xiaocuo Granule and the antibiotic, minocycline (100 mg daily) (worst case = risk ratio (RR) 0.49, 95% CI 0.09 to 2.53, 2 trials, 206 participants at 4 weeks; best case = RR 2.82, 95% CI 0.82 to 9.06, 2 trials, 206 participants at 4 weeks), but there was no clear evidence of a difference between the groups.None of the included studies assessed 'Psychosocial function'.Two studies assessed 'Quality of life', and significant differences in favour of the complementary therapy were found in both of them on 'feelings of self-worth' (MD 1.51, 95% CI 0.88 to 2.14, P < 0.00001, 1 trial, 70 participants; MD 1.26, 95% CI 0.20 to 2.32, 1 trial, 46 participants) and emotional functionality (MD 2.20, 95% CI 1.75 to 2.65, P < 0.00001, 1 trial, 70 participants; MD 0.93, 95% CI 0.17 to 1.69, 1 trial, 46 participants).Because of limitations and concerns about the quality of the included studies, we could not draw a robust conclusion for consistency, size, and direction of outcome effects in this review.

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS:

There is some low-quality evidence from single trials that LGLD, tea tree oil, and bee venom may reduce total skin lesions in acne vulgaris, but there is a lack of evidence from the current review to support the use of other CAMs, such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, or wet-cupping therapy, for the treatment of this condition. There is a potential for adverse effects from herbal medicines; however, future studies need to assess the safety of all of these CAM therapies. Methodological and reporting quality limitations in the included studies weakened any evidence. Future studies should be designed to ensure low risk of bias and meet current reporting standards for clinical trials.

Monday, January 19, 2015

Royal Jelly Increases Nuclear Maturation and GSH Synthesis

305 royal jelly treatment during oocyte maturation improves in vitro meiotic competence of goat oocytes by influencing intracellular glutathione synthesis and apoptosis gene expression
Reprod Fertil Dev. 2014 Dec;27(1):241. doi: 10.1071/RDv27n1Ab305.

Royal jelly (RJ) is a secretion product from the cephalic glands of nurse bees that has extraordinary properties and remarkable health effects. Over the years, antioxidative and antiapoptotic properties of RJ have been experimentally investigated. Here we hypothesised that supplementary RJ in in vitro maturation (IVM) medium would (i) improve cumulus expansion (ii) oocyte nuclear maturation, (iii) glutathione (GSH) content, and (iv) mitochondrial activity, and (v) also affect the mRNA abundance of the (Bax, Bcl-2, and p53) transcripts involved in oocyte apoptosis.

To test these hypotheses, goat ovaries were collected from a local abattoir and transported to the laboratory. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) with multilayered compact cumulus investment and evenly granulated cytoplasm were selected and randomly allocated to the experiments. To evaluate the effects of RJ on meiotic competence after maturation in vitro, IVM medium was supplemented with concentration of 0.0 (RJ-0), 2.5 (RJ-2.5), 5.0 (RJ-5), and 10.0 (RJ-10) mgmL(-1) of RJ. After IVM, oocytes of each group were evaluated for cumulus expansion (visual assessment), stage of nuclear maturation (Hoechst staining), intracellular level of GSH (Cell Tracker blue staining), mitochondrial activity (MitoTracker Deep Red staining), and relative expression of Bax, Bcl-2, and p53 genes (qRT-PCR assay). Differences were analysed for significance by one-way ANOVA using SAS version 8.0 (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC, USA), considering P < 0.05 to be significant. Supplementation of the maturation media with RJ did not appear to affect cumulus expansion (P > 0.05).

Our results revealed that maturation rate was higher (88.0%) in the RJ-10 group when compared with the RJ-2.5 (71.5%) and control (RJ-0) groups (60.0%; P < 0.05), but similar with the RJ-5 group (81%; P > 0.05). A higher (P < 0.05) GSH content was detected when comparisons were made between each concentration of RJ-treated (i.e. RJ-2.5, RJ-5, and RJ-10) oocytes and the control (RJ-0) oocytes; however the differences were not significant when RJ groups were compared. No difference (P>0.05) was observed among RJ-treated and untreated oocytes regarding their mitochondrial activity after IVM. Based on these results, the concentration of 10mgmL(-1) (RJ-10) was selected for evaluation of Bax, Bcl-2, and p53 transcripts abundance.

Our results revealed that the expression of Bax mRNA was decreased (P < 0.05) in RJ-10 group when compared with control (RJ-0) group. Furthermore, there was an increased (P < 0.05) expression of Bcl-2 transcripts in RJ-10 group when compared to the control (RJ-0) group. The p53 transcript also tended to be higher in RJ-10 group than in the control (RJ-0) group, although this difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). In conclusion, results of this study showed that adding RJ to maturation medium at optimum concentration increased the nuclear maturation and GSH synthesis, but not activity of the mitochondria; this improvement was associated with expression of apoptosis-related genes in goat oocytes.

Sunday, January 18, 2015

Honey, Propolis Component Has Anti-Cancer Activity

Chemopreventive and therapeutic potential of chrysin in cancer: mechanistic perspectives
Toxicol Lett. 2015 Jan 14. pii: S0378-4274(15)00020-X

Chrysin, a naturally occurring flavone, abundantly found in numerous plant extracts including propolis and in honey is one of the most widely used herbal medicine in Asian countries. Nowadays, chrysin has become the foremost candidate exhibiting health benefits, owing to its multiple bioactivities such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, anti-diabetic, anti-estrogenic, antibacterial and antitumor activities. Anticancer activity is most promising among the multiple pharmacological effects displayed by chrysin. In vitro and in vivo models have shown that chrysin inhibits cancer growth through induction of apoptosis, alteration of cell cycle and inhibition of angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis without causing any toxicity and undesirable side effects to normal cells. Chrysin displays these effects through selective modulation of multiple cell signaling pathways which are linked to inflammation, survival, growth, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. This broad spectrum of antitumor activity in conjunction with low toxicity underscores the translational value of chrysin in cancer therapy. The present review highlights the chemopreventive and therapeutic effects, molecular targets and antineoplastic mechanisms that contribute to the observed anticancer activity of chrysin.